Healing on the Ogoki – A Huge Success

Alan CheesemanAfter four years of providing “Healing on the Albany”, we decided to do something different this year and bring the Project Healing Waters troops to Striker’s Point for the large pike. As you will find out in the Striker’s Report, changing things up proved to be quite successful. Two of the PHW boys brought home master angler pins to go along with their memorable experience of catching the biggest fish in 5 years of Project Healing Waters events at Wilderness North.

photo collection Aug 2012As many of our loyal guests and devoted readers know, catching a 35 – 40in+ northern out at Striker’s is quite common. Landing that size fish on a fly rod is a great achievement for any angler, and a big morale booster for those who have given up so much to protect our freedom. If you’re an avid fly fisher or new to the sport and want to give it a try, be sure to read Scott Earl-Smith’s post this week as he shares some tricks of the trade and tips on how to land a big one like the PHW boys.

On top of some spectacular pike fishing, the PHW troops took full advantage of the surrounding pristine wilderness to connect with one another, regroup, and find the strength within to tackle both physical and psychological issues left over from their years of service. It is the therapeutic nature of the sport that draws many of us to it. Whether it’s to escape the hustle and bustle of daily life or to find the peace to deal with more serious matters, fishing is something that can be enjoyed by all and Wilderness North is happy to provide these memorable experiences for years to come…

Our week of “Healing on the Ogoki” ended a great month of fishing throughout July and although we said goodbye to some new friends, we also welcomed the start of the August fly fishing season. The cooler temperatures of August provide a great summer escape for families and anglers looking to get outdoors while the warm waters provide the perfect excuse to try your hand at fly fishing for either northern pike or brook/speckled trout.

August marks the beginning of the transition from summer to fall, and with that comes a slight change in fishing patterns as most of the fish are in their lazy summer state. Northerns are lazily camped out in the weed beds looking for a quick bite or a tasty fly and Walleyes are hunkered down deep in their cold dark holes, rarely venturing out except for food. Brookies or specks, on the other hand, are taking advantage of the quieter waters to fatten up as they move for cooler waters and get ready for their fall spawn. Getting ready for spawning also means that brook trout are in full colour, making for a beautiful catch either on a fly rod or traditional rod & reel combinations.

Congrats to a fresh class of master anglers, thanks to all those who helped make this years Project Healing Waters event so successful and, as always, its nice to hear from you!
Keep in touch,
Alan

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